Motorcycle No Chase Law States

Motorcycle No Chase Law States

Motorcycle No Chase Law States: In many states in the United States, there are laws that prevent police cars from chasing motorcycle riders whenever they have committed a crime. This is called the “motorcycle no-chase law.”  You will be surprised to learn that some states have promulgated laws and rules for officers to adhere to when chasing or trying to pursue a fleeing vehicle.

An important aspect of motorcycle no-chase law is that it doesn’t deter officers from deciding whether or not to chase a fleeing lawbreaker on a bike. Rather, it tries to emphasize safety when the police officer is trying to chase and arrest this fleeing criminal. It helps the authority figure to weigh how safe or unsafe it would be to engage in a high-speed chase for the general public, the officer and the suspect who is fleeing.

In this article, I will share information about the laws in the United States that regulate speed pursuit by police amongst other relevant sub-topics.

Motorcycle No Chase Law States

Police pursuing motorcycles is neither unusual nor illegal in the United States. However, each state has its own set of rules for riding motorcycles. Knowing these laws will help you avoid unnecessary charges and detect violations of your rights.

This brings us to the need to consider this theme: Motorcycle no chase law states.

Motorcycle No Chase Law States

The police federation in each state in America changed the laws governing when police officers can pursue fleeing criminals on mopeds and motorcycles.

The main reason for this motorcycle no-chase law is to avoid exacerbating the situation. During the pursuit, the police do not want to injure the person(s) riding the motorcycle or moped. They also don’t want to hurt innocent pedestrians and drivers.

It is not illegal for police to pursue motorcycles that violate motorcycle laws, such as licensing, inspection, and use of public roads. Nonetheless, the motorcycle no-chase law is a preventive measure to avoid loss of life and to ensure public safety.

If a motorcyclist is found wanting, the police may follow at a safe distance because public safety is their top priority. They may also contact other cops in the area in an attempt to track you down or block your path. Furthermore, major roads have CCTV and traffic cameras that can track any traffic offender.

States with No chase Law for Motorcycles

Many states do not have a motorcycle chase law. Alabama is one of the few states in the United States that allows people to ride motorcycles without a license. California is another motorcycle-friendly state with no motorcycle chase laws. By extension, the police will not pursue you on a motorcycle if you violate traffic laws.

Motorcycle no-chase laws differ from state to state. As a result, if you’re a motorcycle rider, make sure you find out if your state supports the no-chase law for motorcycles.

What Happens When a Motorcyclist Gets Caught Without a Motorcycle License?

Driving a motorcycle without a permit or license is a serious offense in the majority of US states.

Although each state has its own motorcycle laws, every state requires you to have a motorcycle license, endorsement, or permit. You can be arrested if you don’t have a license.

To learn more about motorcycle license laws in your state, contact the Department of Motor Vehicles. Depending on where you live, you can get a motorcycle license at the age of 18 or a license permit at the age of 15-17.

Definition of Pursuit

Pursuit is an active attempt by a peace officer in an authorized emergency vehicle to apprehend an actual or suspected law violator who is attempting to avoid apprehension through evasive tactics.

A vehicle pursuit is an event involving one or more law enforcement officers attempting to apprehend a suspect operating a motor vehicle while the suspect is attempting to avoid arrest by using high-speed or other evasive tactics such as driving off a highway, turning suddenly, or driving in a legal manner but willfully failing to yield to the officer’s signal to stop.

Initiation of Pursuit

Any peace officer in an authorized vehicle may initiate a pursuit when ALL of the following criteria are met:

  1. The suspect is attempting to evade apprehension.
  2. The suspect, if allowed to escape, may present a danger to human life or cause serious injury.

Motorcycle Statutes

Every state has its own statutes and laws regarding the operation and maintenance of motorcycles. Knowing these statutes not only allows you to avoid needless charges but also helps you to know when your rights have been violated.

Pursuit Engagement Tactics

According to the Police Pursuit Guidelines, the following are pursuit tactics:

  1. No pursuits will be conducted with a police vehicle while providing transportation for any persons other than sworn law enforcement officers.

  2. To reduce the likelihood of a pursuit occurring, a peace officer intending to stop a vehicle for any violation of the law, except a traffic law, shall, whenever possible and without creating a threat to public safety or peace officers, close the distance between the two vehicles prior to activating emergency lights, an audible device, or otherwise signaling the suspect to stop.

  3. No more than two police vehicles (a Primary Unit and a Secondary Unit) shall become actively involved in a pursuit unless otherwise specifically directed by a supervisor.

  4. Peace officers involved in a pursuit shall not proceed in a direction opposite to the flow of traffic on a divided highway without the specific authorization of a supervisor, if feasible.

  5. Police units that are on a street parallel to a pursuit may not join or interfere with a pursuit unless specifically directed by a supervisor.

  6. All units in a pursuit, whether the Primary or Secondary Unit, should be spaced sufficiently to successfully execute basic maneuvers.

  7. Upon approaching an intersection controlled by traffic signals or signs, or any other location at which there is an increased likelihood of a collision, the driver of any pursuit vehicle shall, prior to entering the intersection or upon the approach to any other such location where there is an increased likelihood of a collision, reduce the vehicle’s speed so as to avoid a collision with another vehicle or pedestrian. Peace officers shall ensure that the way is clear before proceeding through an intersection or otherwise increasing speed. Pursuing peace officers are expected to maintain complete control of their vehicles at all times.

  8. A motorcycle officer may initiate a pursuit, providing that the proper justification exists, but will relinquish Primary Unit status immediately upon the participation of a marked police vehicle. Upon relinquishing Primary Unit status, motorcycles shall terminate active involvement in a pursuit unless there are extremely exigent circumstances or are otherwise directed by a supervisor.

  9. Semi-marked units may initiate a pursuit providing that the proper justification exists, but will relinquish Primary Unit status immediately upon the participation of a marked police car. Upon relinquishing primary status, semi-marked units shall terminate active involvement in a pursuit unless they are needed to fulfill Secondary Unit responsibilities or are otherwise directed by a supervisor.

  10. Unmarked or other departmental vehicles, except for marked, semi-marked, and motorcycle units, may not initiate a pursuit without the authorization of a supervisor unless there is an imminent threat to life or great bodily harm represented by the continued freedom of the suspect.

  11. Throughout the course of the pursuit, pursuing peace officers shall not attempt to overtake, pull alongside, or pass the suspect’s moving vehicle without the specific authorization of a supervisor, if feasible. Peace officers shall not pass other units involved in a pursuit unless the passing peace officer receives specific permission from the Primary Unit.

  12. Peace officers may use stationary stop techniques to terminate any pursuit so long as the technique is employed in a fashion that is not calculated to cause death or great bodily harm to persons in the pursued vehicle or others in the vicinity (i.e., the pursued vehicle has sufficient time and distance to stop before reaching the roadblock or the technology employed is designed to disable the vehicle without the loss of control). Where feasible, a peace officer should obtain authorization from a supervisor before implementing stationary stop techniques. Absent exigent circumstances, such techniques should not be employed by peace officers that have not been trained in the application of the selected technique.

  13. Peace officers may use mobile stop techniques to terminate any pursuit so long as the technique is employed in a fashion that is not calculated to cause death or great bodily harm to persons in the pursued vehicle or others in the vicinity. Where feasible, a peace officer should obtain authorization from a supervisor before implementing mobile stop techniques. Absent exigent circumstances, such techniques should not be employed by peace officers that have not been trained in the application of the selected technique.

  14. At low speeds [20 MPH or below], the use of forcible stop techniques is permitted when there is a legal justification for the use of force. Where feasible, a peace officer should obtain authorization from a supervisor before implementing forcible stop techniques. Absent exigent circumstances, such techniques should not be employed by peace officers that have not been trained in the application of the selected technique.

  15. At high speeds [in excess of 20 MPH], the use of forcible stop techniques is permitted ONLY when there is a legal justification for the use of deadly force. Where feasible, a peace officer implementing forcible stop techniques. Absent exigent circumstances, such techniques should not be employed by peace officers that have not been trained in the application of the selected technique.

  16. Peace officers involved in a pursuit shall not discharge any firearm from or at a moving vehicle nor engage in any vehicle contact action except as a last resort to prevent imminent death or serious bodily injury to an officer or another person where deadly force would otherwise be legally justified. Where feasible, a peace officer should obtain authorization from a supervisor before discharging a weapon from or at a moving vehicle.

Termination of Pursuit

Pursuing peace officer(s) should terminate pursuit when:

  1. The danger to the public or the pursuing peace officer outweighs the necessity for immediate apprehension of the suspect. Consideration should be given to the following conditions: speed of the pursuit, area of the pursuit, weather and road conditions, the presence of pedestrians and other traffic, the presence or absence of audible or visible warnings, and the reason for the pursuit of the fleeing vehicle, or;
  2. The distance between the pursuing peace officer and the suspect is so great that further pursuit is futile, or;
  3. The peace officer loses visual contact with the suspect for an extended period of time or;
  4. The suspect is identified, and the failure to apprehend poses no immediate threat of death or serious injury to another person or;
  5. There are malfunctions with police equipment or the police vehicle (e.g., emergency lighting, siren) which make continued operation of the vehicle in a pursuit hazardous, or;
  6. When ordered to do so by a supervisor.

Motorcycle No Chase Law for Different States

The PA General Assembly states that “each police department shall develop and implement a written emergency vehicle response policy governing the procedures under which a police officer should initiate, continue and terminate a motor vehicle pursuit. This policy may be the model policy endorsed by a national or state organization or association of police chiefs or police officers.”

Hence, we have compiled a list of motorcycle no-chase laws for various states.

Access the motorcycle no chase law from different states below:

  1. Illinois – policepursuitguidelines
  2. California – Vehicle_Pursuit
  3. South Bend – Current Vehicle Pursuits Policy 306 -6.19.19
  4. Bedford –  purusit_policy_chapter_41-8_0
  5. Nebraska
  6. Albany, New York – GO 3.1.15
  7. Fond du Lac – GO 3.1.15 (1)
  8. New Orleans – Chapter-41-5-Vehicle-Pursuits
  9. Texas – VehicularPursuitPolicy
  10. Colorado – VehicularPursuitPolicy (1)
  11. New Jersey – vehpurs
  12. Iowa – ISP-Pursuit-policy
  13. Fairfax Country – go-504

What All Drivers Should Know About Motorcycles

The following is what all drivers should know about motorcycles, as submitted by Vermont State Police:

  • Over half of all fatal motorcycle crashes involve another vehicle. Most of the time, the motorist, not the motorcyclist, is at fault. There are a lot more cars and trucks than motorcycles on the road, and some drivers don’t “recognize” a motorcycle – they ignore it (usually unintentionally).

  • Because of its small size, a motorcycle can be easily hidden in a car’s blind spots (door/roof pillars) or masked by objects or backgrounds outside a car (bushes, fences, bridges, etc). Take an extra moment to look for motorcycles, whether you’re changing lanes or turning at intersections.

  • Because of its small size, a motorcycle may look farther away than it is. It may also be difficult to judge a motorcycle’s speed. When checking traffic to turn at an intersection or into (or out of) a driveway, predict a motorcycle is closer than it looks.

  • Motorcyclists often slow by downshifting or merely rolling off the throttle, thus not activating the brake light. Allow more following distance, say 3 or 4 seconds. At intersections, predict a motorcyclist may slow down without visual warning.

  • Motorcyclists often adjust their position within a lane to be seen more easily and to minimize the effects of road debris, passing vehicles, and wind. Understand that motorcyclists adjust lane position for a purpose, not to be reckless or show off or to allow you to share the lane with them.

  • Turn signals on a motorcycle usually are not self-canceling. Thus, some riders (especially beginners) sometimes forget to turn them off after a turn or lane change. Make sure a motorcycle’s signal is for real.

  • Maneuverability is one of a motorcycle’s better characteristics, especially at slower speeds and with good road conditions, but don’t expect a motorcyclist to always be able to dodge out of the way.

  • The stopping distance for motorcycles is nearly the same as for cars, but slippery pavement makes stopping quickly difficult. Allow more following distance behind a motorcycle because it can’t always stop “on a dime.”

  • When a motorcycle is in motion, see more than the motorcycle – see the person under the helmet, who could be your friend, neighbor, or relative.

  • If a driver crashes into a motorcyclist, bicyclist, or pedestrian and causes serious injury, the driver would likely never forgive himself/herself.

General Guidelines For Riding A Motorcycle Safely

Be visible:

  • Remember that motorists often have trouble seeing motorcycles.
  • Make sure your headlight works and is on day and night.
  • Use reflective strips or decals on your clothing and on your motorcycle.
  • Avoid riding in the blind spots of cars and trucks.
  • If possible, flash your brake light when you are slowing down and before stopping.
  • Have an escape route in case a motorist doesn’t see you and violates your right-of-way.

Dress for safety:

  • Wear a quality helmet and eye protection. A full-face helmet provides the best protection.
  • Wear leather or other sturdy, protective clothing (jacket and pants); over-the-ankle boots; and gloves.
  • Bright clothing and a light-colored helmet increase the chances of being seen.
  • Dress for a crash as well as for the ride.

Apply effective mental strategies:

  • Constantly search the road for changing conditions. Use the Search-Evaluate-Execute strategy (SEE) to assess and respond to hazards before you have to react to an emergency.
  • Give yourself space and time as you search for traps and escape paths.
  • Give other motorists time and space to respond to you.
  • Use lane positioning to see and be seen.
  • Search for vehicles that may turn across your path, especially at intersections.
  • Use your turn signals for all turns and lane changes.
  • Ride as if you’re invisible.
  • Don’t ride when you are tired or under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.
  • Know and follow the rules of the road.

Know your bike and how to use it:

  • Study your motorcycle’s owner’s manual and make a habit of doing a pre-ride check.

  • Get formal hands-on training and take refresher courses. Call 800.446.9227 or visit msf-usa.org to locate a Motorcycle Safety Foundation RiderCourseSM near you.

  • Develop your riding techniques before venturing into traffic, especially emergency braking and swerving maneuvers. Practice often to keep your skills sharp.

  • Corner within your skill limits. Aggressive cornering is a major cause of crashes.

  • Know how to handle your bike in adverse conditions such as wet or sandy roads, high winds, and uneven surfaces.

     

Motorcycle No Chase Law States FAQ

 

Does Chicago have a no chase law?

Yes, police officers are restricted from chasing or carrying out a pursuit of a suspect when there’s some safety concern to the general public, the police officer and law breaker.

Does Georgia have a no-chase law?

Yes, the law restricts law officers from chasing property offences, bad behavior, minor traffic offences, or civil disobedience. Officers have been banned from pursuing a vehicle to arrest an escaping lawbreaker who does not pose a death threat or injury.

Are police permitted to chase motorcycles in the UK?

Police are restricted from chasing a fleeing suspect on a motorcycle who isn’t putting on a crash helmet.

That is it for our motorcycle no chase states article. We hope you find it informative. Let us know in the comment section below. Thank you.

Recommended:

Who killed Alison in Pretty Little Liars

When can Navigation Rules be Overlooked?

Why Do Orthopedic Surgeons Hate Podiatrists? (Top 7 Reasons)

 

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply